Broken AC Unit?


How to tell if your AC unit needs a mild repair or totally replaced


It is not uncommon for someone to turn on their air conditioning for the first time in months, only to find out the system is not responding, and it is often not uncommon for this to happen once summer has rolled around. At this point, it may take time for an HVAC repair, because plenty of people did not keep up on maintenance and now need the same repairs. Also, costs for these repairs will be higher than if they would have been completed before it was essentially an emergency situation.

However, what should you do if your AC unit seemed to be fine initially, but has mysteriously stopped working? Checking the often-neglected parts of your system can sometimes offer a solution. Below are some suggestions Trane offers, should your air conditioning randomly stop working properly, or at all.

No air movement

While the air conditioning unit cools the air, your system's fan or air handler moves it through the house. If your air conditioner does not seem to be functioning at all, check the main electrical panel and any secondary circuit panels for a tripped breaker or blown fuse. If you find the problem there, reset the breaker by turning it off and then on, and/or replace the fuse. Make sure the thermostat is set to cool and its temperature setting is at least 3 degrees below the ambient room temperature. Finally, check the batteries on your thermostat. 

No cold air

There are a few potential causes if air is moving through your home, but it is not cool. One is that dust and debris could build up, making heat exchange less efficient. To remedy this, make sure nothing is blocking or limiting air flow anywhere in the system—the air filters, registers, and the compressor.

A lesser-known reason for why your system may not be blowing out cold air is that ice has accumulated and is blocking airflow. This happens if air filters are too dirty to allow for flow or if the refrigerant is low. Cleaning the air filters will take care of the former problem, and calling Commercial Service to recharge the refrigerant will solve the latter issue.

The drain pan is overflowing

The drain pan below your interior air conditioning unit collects condensation, and an electric pump usually moves the water to a nearby drainage pipe. If the pan is overflowing, check for a kink or block in the drainage line, and make sure that the pump is plugged in and working.

Constantly-running system

If your air conditioner seems to be running constantly, your thermostat could be set too high. Reset your thermostat, then adjust the temperature to a comfortable level. It could also be that your thermostat is entirely broken, or there is a wiring issue in the electrical system that runs the outside of your air conditioning system.

If there is nothing at all displaying on your thermostat, make sure there are no cross-connected wires. If the wiring appears to be okay, buy a new thermostat and install it according to the instructions. If the a/c does not turn off, the contacts on the outdoor run relay may have welded together; this can happen over time because of frequent electrical arcing at the relay. In this instance, it is best to let a Commercial Service technician aid in repairing the system.

 

 

If you are still experiencing air conditioner troubles, schedule an appointment with our easy Online Scheduling or by calling 812-339-9114.

 

 

 

Check out these related articles: Giving Your AC Some TLC and Make Your Home Work for You: Smart Home Automation

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